Supply Chain Professor

Industry:
Education
Last Updated:
September 19, 2023

Job Description Overview

A Supply Chain Professor job description involves teaching and conducting research in the field of supply chain management. Supply chain management involves the planning, sourcing, manufacturing, and delivery of products and services to customers. A Supply Chain Professor is responsible for educating students on topics such as logistics, inventory management, procurement, transportation, and global supply chain management. They may also teach courses on data analytics and technology tools used in supply chain management. 

A Supply Chain Professor must keep up-to-date with industry trends and technology advancements, and may collaborate with industry partners to offer real-world experiences to students. Research is also an important aspect of the job, where they may publish papers and attend conferences to present their work. 

Overall, a Supply Chain Professor helps students develop the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in supply chain management careers. They also contribute to the academic community with their research and thought leadership.

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Job Duties and Responsibilities

  • Teach courses on supply chain management, logistics and operations management
  • Develop course materials such as syllabi, lectures and assignments
  • Conduct research in the supply chain field and publish findings in journals and case studies
  • Advise and mentor students pursuing careers in supply chain management 
  • Collaborate with industry partners to create internship and job opportunities for students 
  • Encourage critical thinking and problem solving among students to prepare them for real-world challenges 
  • Stay current on industry trends and innovations to bring relevant knowledge to the classroom 
  • Work with other faculty members to continuously improve the supply chain program 
  • Attend academic conferences and events to network with other supply chain experts and share knowledge 
  • Serve on academic committees and participate in the accreditation process of the supply chain program.

Experience and Education Requirements

To get a job as a Supply Chain Professor, you need a lot of education and experience. Most employers look for someone with a Ph.D. in supply chain management, logistics or a related field. You should also have several years of practical experience working in the supply chain industry. This will give you the knowledge and skills to teach others about supply chain management, like planning, sourcing, manufacturing, delivery, and returns. In addition to your education and experience, you need to be able to communicate well and inspire students to learn. You may also need to conduct research and publish academic papers to keep up with industry developments.

Salary Range

A Supply Chain Professor in the Education industry can expect a salary range of $77,000 to $173,000 per year in the United States. The average base salary for Supply Chain Professors is about $120,000 per year, with higher salaries seen in metropolitan areas such as New York, Boston, and San Francisco. In other countries, salaries vary greatly depending on the cost of living and experience. For example, in Canada, the average salary for Supply Chain Professors is around CAD 116,000 per year, while in the United Kingdom it's around £60,000 per year.

Sources:

  1. Glassdoor.com
  2. Payscale.com
  3. Salary.com

Career Outlook

The career outlook for a Supply Chain Professor in the education industry over the next 5 years is positive. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow by 9% from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. As the supply chain industry continues to evolve and expand worldwide, the demand for knowledgeable and skilled instructors also increases. Moreover, supply chain management is now recognized as a vital component of a business's success, and universities are keen on implementing this program into their curriculum. As a result, there will be an increase in job opportunities for Supply Chain Professors, making it a promising career choice for those interested in education and the supply chain industry.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q: What does a Supply Chain Professor do?

A: A Supply Chain Professor teaches students about the best practices and principles of supply chain management, including logistics, procurement, and operations management.

Q: What kind of degree do you need to become a Supply Chain Professor?

A: To become a Supply Chain Professor, you typically need a Ph.D. in Supply Chain Management, Operations Management, or a related field. 

Q: What kind of skills do you need to be a successful Supply Chain Professor?

A: Successful Supply Chain Professors possess strong communication skills, critical thinking skills, an ability to explain complex concepts in simple terms, and have practical experience in the industry.

Q: What is the job outlook for Supply Chain Professors?

A: The job outlook for Supply Chain Professors is positive as the demand for supply chain management courses continues to grow. This is due to the increasing complexity of global supply chains and the need for skilled professionals.

Q: How does a Supply Chain Professor help students after they graduate?

A: A Supply Chain Professor can help students after they graduate by providing career advice, industry connections, and recommendations for job opportunities. They also prepare students to be industry-ready by providing real-world scenarios in the classroom.


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