HR Project Manager

Last Updated:
July 19, 2023

Job Description Overview

An HR Project Manager's job in the Human Resources industry is to oversee and manage various projects related to HR functions, such as recruitment, training, and employee engagement. This role requires exceptional leadership, organization, and communication skills, as well as the ability to multitask and prioritize responsibilities. HR Project Managers work with various stakeholders, including HR departments, senior management, and external vendors, to ensure project timelines, budgets, and objectives are met. Additionally, they monitor project progress, identify any roadblocks or issues, and implement corrective action plans to address them. To be successful in this role, a degree in HR, Business, or a related field, along with previous project management experience, is preferred. HR Project Manager job descriptions typically contain information about desired qualifications, responsibilities, and required skills.

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Job Duties and Responsibilities

  • Communicating and collaborating with stakeholders to determine project goals and requirements.
  • Creating project plans, timelines, and budgets.
  • Managing project resources and ensuring deliverables are completed on time and within budget.
  • Tracking and reporting progress to stakeholders and upper management.
  • Managing project risks and identifying potential roadblocks.
  • Ensuring compliance with company policies, laws, and regulations.
  • Coordinating with various HR departments to ensure project success.
  • Conducting regular team meetings and providing feedback to team members.
  • Identifying areas of improvement and making recommendations for process enhancements.
  • Ensuring that all project documentation is accurate and up-to-date.

Experience and Education Requirements

To become a HR Project Manager, you usually need a Bachelor's degree in Human Resources, Business Administration or a similar field. Some employers might also require a Master's degree or professional HR certification like SHRM-CP or PHR. 

A good understanding of HR policies, procedures, and employment laws is essential for this job. It's also important to have experience in project management, as you will be responsible for coordinating HR projects from start to finish.

Working in HR administration or related field for at least 3 years is often required for an HR project manager role. Previous experience in leading cross-functional teams, managing budgets, and analyzing data is also beneficial.

Overall, you need both education and practical experience in HR and project management to succeed as a HR Project Manager.

Salary Range

If you're interested in becoming an HR Project Manager, you might be wondering about the expected salary range for this role. In the United States, HR Project Managers earn an average salary of $89,000 per year according to Glassdoor. However, this can vary based on factors like location, company size, industry, and years of experience. For example, HR Project Managers in New York City can earn an average of $101,000 per year according to PayScale. In the UK, the average salary for a HR Project Manager is between £38,000 - £55,000 per year according to Totaljobs. In Australia, the average salary is around AU$108,000 per year according to Indeed.

Sources:

  • Glassdoor: https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/hr-project-manager-salary-SRCH_KO0,18.htm
  • PayScale: https://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=HRProjectManager/Salary
  • Totaljobs: https://www.totaljobs.com/salary-checker/average-hr-project-manager-salary

Career Outlook

The career outlook for HR Project Managers looks promising over the next five years. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of human resources managers, including HR Project Managers, is projected to grow 6 percent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. This growth is due to the increasing importance of human resources and its impact on business success. Companies recognize the value of HR Project Managers in facilitating efficient and effective communication and implementation of key initiatives. Additionally, HR Project Managers possess skills that can be utilized in various industries, providing them with a range of career options. In conclusion, HR Project Managers have a bright future ahead!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Q: What does a HR Project Manager do?

A: A HR Project Manager oversees various human resources projects for a company, ensuring objectives are met and timelines are followed.

Q: What qualifications does someone need to become a HR Project Manager?

A: Generally, a Bachelor's degree in human resources or a related field is necessary, along with several years of experience in HR or project management.

Q: What are the biggest challenges faced by a HR Project Manager?

A: The biggest challenges usually involve balancing the needs and expectations of different stakeholders, such as employees, management and clients, while also delivering projects on time and within budget.

Q: What kind of skills are important for a HR Project Manager to have?

A: Project management skills are key, along with strong communication, leadership, organizational and problem-solving abilities. Knowledge of relevant HR laws and regulations is also important.

Q: What is the career path for a HR Project Manager?

A: Career advancement can come in the form of taking on bigger and more complex projects, moving into a more senior HR role, or branching out into other sectors such as change management, consulting or leadership coaching.


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